SubscriptionsGo to the Subscriptions Centre to manage your:My ProfileIt’s been a longtime custom to send out holiday greeting cards to relatives and friends this time of year, but creative individuals have increasingly been turning to online video sites to share unique sentimental missives.Take Teri Smith and Rob Maurin, a Toronto couple, who posted this charming Christmas greeting video on YouTube last week. The pair is shown dancing and lip synching to the holiday classic Baby, It’s Cold Outside, in several different places they’ve visited together, from Chicago to sun drenched Mexico.Instead of mailing out family photos this year, the Teesdale family created a slideshow on YouTube to accompany their holiday message.And check out this neat stop motion animated video featuring toy animals (and a “Christmas cucumber”) by YouTube user Eiksmusic.How do you prefer to send your holiday greetings: online or by snail mail? We’re on the lookout for creative, humorous or touching holiday greeting videos.Internet freedom: Should government have the ability to shut down the internet?The Egyptian government shut down access to the internet and the country’s cellphone data network early Friday, according to media reports. Internet and cellphone data service was unavailable throughout the country, making it impossible for news of the protests.

Most of the North Indian loves their Banaras sarees that are authentically woven by weavers from a small village called Banaras on the banks of river Ganga. Further, West Bengal is a very famous destination for women clad in beautiful cotton sarees. These sarees are extremely soft, stiff and beautiful.

Deras anledning r att de anser att hastighetsgrnsen fr nrvarande r mycket liten. De flesta av det amerikanska folket r inte njda med moderat hastighet vid krning. De vill vara den snabbaste fraren p vg samt f till de platser som de ska p rekordtid, de vill alltid vara i race..

Ka ambu on muistsed relv, varu, mis kivitab kuulid, tuntud kui poldid paigaldatud vri, mis koosneb. Laoarvestuses mehhanism vimaldab laeva vib igal ajal tielikult joonistada asendisse. Selle ambu on tielikult tmmatavad seni, kuni see kohale pstikuks vabastades.

Get daily updates directly to your inbox+ SubscribeSee our privacy noticeThank you for subscribing!It’s a landlocked ex Soviet republic in the heart of Central Asia but, once, it was at the heart of the Silk Road . The ancient trading route between east and west.Its cities were centres of commerce, culture and learning influenced by the achievements of such conquerors as Alexander the Great and Genghis Khan, and it was home to one of the mightiest of all warlords . Tamerlane.It was Tamerlane’s rule at the end of the 14th century that saw the birth of the architectural style known as Timurid, seen in the glazed majolica tiles and mosaics of azure and turquoise which decorate the domes and facades of the many mosques, medressas and mausoleums.I travelled to the capital city Tashkent, a relatively modern city with a strong Russian influence dating back to the days of the Tsars.The important state museums of national history and art are based here and are certainly worth a visit, but it wasn’t until I set off along the route of the Silk Road that I felt my journey had really begun.My first stop along the way was the 2750 year old city of Samarkand. This had been Tamerlane’s capital and was also his burial place, and the monuments built by him and his descendants are to be found across the city.In fact, Samarkand is home to what is truly one of the wonders of the world . The Registan, a large, central square surrounded on three sides by the imposing Tilla kari, Ulugbek and Sher Dor medressas, the latter two flanked by towering minarets.As well as the burial place of Tamerlane, it contains his greatest architectural achievement, the enormous Bibi Khanym mosque.Another sight not to be missed is the Shah I Zinda burial complex, an avenue of beautifully decorated mausoleums.Staying in one of the many modern hotels in the city, I found it was easy to navigate my way around the streets, tree lined avenues and parks of Samarkand, and all the main sights were within easy walking distance of each other.Following the decline of the Timurid dynasty, other cities in the area rose to prominence as the seats of independent khanates. Bukhara, to the west, was one of these and was, at one time, the intellectual centre of the Islamic world.Once famous for the many pools around which its public squares were built, now just the main one, Lyabi Hauz, still remains.

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